Tim Groen Yoga

"Last summer I led the public meditation on the High Line for Integral Yoga Institute and I’ll be doing it again a couple of times this year. When total strangers, including a handful of random tourists, stick with you for an hour and practice pranayama for maybe the first time in their life, it feels pretty awesome ..."

Wanderlust Weekly: Congrats on the growth of your practice, Tim! What inspired you to become an instructor? Tim Groen: It’s my svadharma, my path! In the late nineties, when I first started taking classes, a teacher told me I should consider teacher training. I though: ‘Yeah right. Like that’ll happen.” I was too shy then, and not very convinced of my practice. Then, throughout the years, people kept asking me if I was a teacher when I was totally not, and gradually I began to think that maybe it wasn’t such a stretch. I began to understand that it could be possible that I would convincingly express my love for the practice. That I could serve, and make others as happy with it as I am. And now, many years later, I get a kick out of teaching that I can’t compare to anything.

Wanderlust Weekly: You've built a strong community following in New York, what are some of your proudest moments? Tim Groen: Last summer I led the public meditation on the High Line for Integral Yoga Institute and I’ll be doing it again a couple of times this year. When total strangers, including a handful of random tourists, stick with you for an hour and practice pranayama for maybe the first time in their life, it feels pretty awesome. Besides that, rather than individual milestones to be proud of, I’m just really happy  - and maybe a little proud - to be studying and teaching here in New York. To be considered by my private and group students at all, in this vast ocean of offerings, is great in itself already!
 
Wanderlust Weekly: The wellness field is constantly evolving, what upcoming news or developments can we look forward to? Tim Groen: I can only speak about what I see in Yoga. There’s a trend towards Yoga experiences that are much more internal. I think its like with anything else in the consumer realm; people don’t want the additives, they want ‘organic’,  they want perceived  ‘authenticity’. More and more people are into classical Hatha Yoga the way it feels real; no music, longer holds, lots of pranayama practice, meditation. It makes sense; just like meditation is becoming more and more mainstream, you see that a lot of people are interested going deep, in their physical practice, but also in the sense that they are eager to learn about Sanskrit, the Yoga Sutras, and chanting. So you could say that part of the Yoga audience is moving away from a commercial gym-like appraoch, in favor of something that resonates with them on more than one level; yoga for all koshas. Of course I’m really happy with that tendency, and I think its here to stay!  

[ photos by Liz Brown ]